Funerals Info

How To Write A Eulogy

Mar
12

It is a true honor to be asked to write a eulogy for someone’s funeral. Although it is a great task to be given, it can also be very difficult and cause a lot of pressure because it is very stressful to stand in front of the deceased’s loved ones and deliver a funeral speech. People may have concerns that will not deliver the eulogy properly or that there is no way to sum of a person’s entire life in the matter of minutes. Others are afraid they will get too emotional and will not even be able to say anything from their speech. Overall, this can be a very scary task.

Instead of trying to cope with all of these stressful notions, there is a better process to writing and delivering a eulogy. It does not have to just come to you. It has to be a well thought out activity. Treat it like you are writing a speech for school. It should be brain stormed, outlined, and organized. Remember, you are celebrating someone’s life so it should not be too depressing. Funeral speeches should include poetry and should give closure or comfort to the audience. It should be no longer than 5 minutes. If you need great examples of eulogies, go to eulogiesmadeeasy.com.

There is a step by step process on how to write this sort of speech including gathering all of the memories you have about the deceased, don’t stress out, choose the theme of how the speech will flow, organize the middle, organize the beginning, and then finally organize the end. Using a process can be much more helpful than just winging it because you often would not know where to start and that can be very overwhelming. The delivering of the speech should also follow a few guidelines. It needs to be reviewed and practiced. It should not be rushed because that sets the wrong vibe for the speech. Taking your time is always a good idea. Last but not least, the loved ones of the deceased would very much appreciate a copy of the eulogy. This allows them to keep it the deceased in their hearts by holding on to your precious words.

The biggest mistake that people make when writing and delivering funeral speeches is not thinking of it as a step by step process or an actual speech. They put so much pressure on themselves to make it perfect when really it can be very simple as long as you keep collected.

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Eulogy

Mar
05

When a relative or friend passes away, of course it’s a very sad time for everyone in their circle of relationships. We seem to discover things about them after their passing, such as good deeds they performed anonymously throughout their life. We also remember events, milestones and silly interactions with the deceased that make us smile or laugh. All of these things are valuable tools when called upon to construct a eulogy.

There is a brief moment of terror when asked to deliver a funeral speach. This is a normal reaction as one would experience on any occasion that calls for public speaking. Being called upon to eulogize the deceased is a great honor as you wouldn’t have been asked had you not been an important person in their life. Some feel that funeral speaches are best delivered extemporaneously, but it’s a safer bet to at least have some key points prepared. Start with a brief opening to let the gathering know who you are in relation to the deceased. For example “My name is Jane Doe, and I am Bob’s neice, friend, student and charter member of his fan club.” There should be a brief closing remark as well. This should be something particularly poignant, pointing to his lasting legacy.

Thinking of the departed, point to accomplishments during their life that set them apart. Professional, social, charitable, and family impacts should be highlighted. Think also of some dichotomies in their life, for example, “Though a farmer at heart, his love of poetry made him a true renaissance man.” If there is a favorite poem, reading or scripture, include that also. Humor is permissible and is not irreverent, depending on the life of the deceased. For example, if he was widely known as a prankster, joker, or general bon vivant, you might say “When Bob took the microphone at karaoke night, he never gave it back. He rocked the house the rest of the night.”

The most important thing to remember when giving a funeral speach is the person themselves. If you have been asked to give a eulogy or speach, you are a person who has held a place of honor in the decedent’s life. You are paying a heartfelt tribute and providing a memorable gift to those who are mourning their loss.